#001 Jessica Beacom of Real Food Dietitians

Jessica Beacom (@therealfoodrds) is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in Boulder, CO and half of the duo behind The Real Food Dietitians.

Jessica has been practicing nutrition for more than 14 years helping folks find freedom from diets and calorie counting to find true health and wellness through a real food diet.

Through their website (therealfoodrds.com) Jessica and her partner Stacie have created an amazing resource for recipes and menu planning guides that will suit any busy lifestyle.

My favorite quote from the conversation:

That floppy head of broccoli you’re wasting could have been a new pair of skis.

If you are like me and feel constantly under the gun to create good, healthy meals that the family will enjoy, but want some new ideas, this episode is absolutely for you!

 


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Selected Links from the Episode

The Weston A. Price Foundation

It Starts With Food

The Loving Diet

The Alley Loop Race Series – CBNordic.org

Instant Pot Pressure Cooker

 

Show Notes

[2:45] Path to Colorado and the Dietitian world

[7:00] The Accidental Mompreneur

[15:00] Whole 30 Diet and Motivation

[18:30] Meal Planning – Secret cooking weapon!

[25:00] Favorite ski spots, activities with the kids, local outdoor activities that win

[31:00] Who would you love to hear on this podcast?  (spoiler alert: It’s Fanny Toorenburg of Hill Road Merino)

 


 

Transcript:

Colorado Podcast Episode with Real Food Dietitians

Doug Stetzer:

Hey, everyone. Doug Stetzer here, and thanks for tuning into this episode of Colorado.FM – The Colorado Podcast. Today, we’re going to be speaking with Jessica Beacom, a registered dietitian and nutritionist based here in Colorado right in Boulder. She is half of the duo behind The Real Food Dietitians, a food and lifestyle website that encourages you to eat clean, live well, and be awesome.

You can find them at therealfoodrds, that’s therealfoodrds.com, and also on Instagram @therealfoodrds. I really encourage you to check into their Instagram. It’s one of my favorite feeds to follow. The recipes and the food is amazing and, as she will get into in the interview, it’s really kept simple, something that’s really accessible, and I think that’s a challenge for most of us out there that are trying to eat well but can’t really be consumed with the cooking.

A little more about Jessica, she’s been practicing nutrition for more than 14 years, helping those she works with find freedom from diets and calorie counting and helping them find true health and wellness through a real food diet. It’s really amazing how she ended up in Colorado … her route took her from Minnesota, to Montana, to Alaska, to Boulder … and how their business has really thrived in this environment. Here she is, my interview with Jessica Beacom of The Real Food Dietitians.

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Jessica, thanks for coming into the studio. How are you today?

Jessica Beacom:

Hey, Doug. I’m good. Thanks for having me.

Doug Stetzer:

Excellent. Today we wanted to talk about The Real Food Dietitians and the people behind it. Real Food Dietitians is … From their website I’m reading, “Dedicated to sharing healthy recipes and nutrition tips that can be easily applied in everyday life.” Tell us a little bit about where you come from, how you ended up in Colorado, and were you always in food? How long have you been doing this food thing? What brought you into the dietitian world?

Jessica Beacom:

Okay. This is a long story. No, I’m kidding. I’m originally from Minnesota. When I graduated from college, or from high school actually, I moved to Montana to be a ski bum. As I was ski bumming, there was a university, and I thought, “Well, you know, maybe I should get a degree,” so I got a degree in nutrition. Then I went to the University of Alaska to do my internship. Then, from there, I got a job in public heath and stayed there for a few years. It was a crazy job. It was like 70 hours a week. Then I moved back to Montana and I worked in a hospital. It sucked my soul from me, and so in 2011, after my second child was born, we moved to Colorado because that’s where my husband’s from. We got here and I was a stay-at-home mom and got really into the whole Weston A. Price movement, cooking everything from scratch, soaking, sprouting, souring, fermenting, everything, just like my whole life was food. Then a huge garden, my own chickens.

Then a couple years into that, I was totally stir-crazy. I needed to go back to being a professional and having a brain again, and so I decided to go back to private practice. I worked in private practice and I specialized in digestive disorders and autoimmune diseases, and it started to suck my soul again because it was so much work and everybody was so sick. Then, everybody would always say, “You should have a website,” like, “Can I get that recipe?” Then it was like, “Oh, yeah. I should have a website where I can put the recipe.”

I met my business partner, Stacie, right about this time at a conference in New York City, one that I almost didn’t go to and she almost didn’t go to, and we just happened to sit next to each other that day. Long story short, we decided to write a book. It was going to be an ebook. It was going to be a small ebook. We’re going to give it to our clients like, “Hey, here’s our recipes you’re always asking for.” The book turned into a 96-page monster, and then two more followed it. Then we finally decided, “Yeah, we should start a business,” and so we started an online meal plan membership where you could go in and every month we would send you a menu, and all of the recipes, and the shopping list. We were pretty sure it was going to be the greatest thing on the planet, and it was total bomb. Our moms signed up and their friends. We ended up, after three months, pulling the plug on it. We refunded everybody their money and were like, “God, we’re so sorry.”

Doug Stetzer:

It’s like, “That was an experiment.”

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah, it was a soul sucker. Yeah, it sucked the life out of us. Then we decided one day … I remember it was October of 2015, we were like, “Hey, let’s just blog.” Neither one of us really knew what went into a blog, and I didn’t really know how to build a website. I had somebody build my private practice website. I flew to Minnesota where Stacie lives, and in three days we built a website and we started this blog. The photos were awful, and we were like, “Yeah, we’re gonna do this.” It was October of 2015. Fast forward 18 months now, and we have this really big blog, and I have learned to build websites and … so yeah, that’s kind of where we are, so how I got here physically and then how I got to the blog.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, that’s really interesting. You have this clinical background, and that environment just wasn’t really working for you personally.

Jessica Beacom:

No.

Doug Stetzer:

Although it was working for your clients, because they were like, “Hey, we want more of this. We want more of your good food.”

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah.

Doug Stetzer:

I happen to know for a fact when you’re bringing in your dill pickle carrots from the garden and things like that, that people want them. They’re like, “I want a jar of that. Stop giving me one. I want a whole thing.” I can imagine what your clients were thinking at that time. Then, it’s really serendipitous, I guess, this meeting up with your partner and then going through this really probably common and painful entrepreneurial journey of missteps and just-

Jessica Beacom:

Spending.

Doug Stetzer:                       .

.. craziness, “If you build it, they will come,” nonsense that a lot of us, I think, have been through in the web world. “I’m gonna put up a website,” and that’s it. “Stand back everyone, the money’s about to come rolling in.”

Jessica Beacom:

We were going to kill it. We were going to break PayPal.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, exactly. “I hope Chase can handle the money coming in,” right?

Jessica Beacom:

Exactly.

Doug Stetzer:

That’s really interesting. I think one of the things that I was hoping to identify when I start talking to people is some of these common threads that we go through when we decide we want to live somewhere. We want to live in Colorado, and so you come here, and maybe you have a regular job or maybe you’re an entrepreneur. I think there’s such a great amount of entrepreneurial spirit around here, and that’s what’s really interesting. There’s these common threads that people go through regardless of the industry, and it’s just always funny to hear what steps in the journey actually got people here.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah. I mean, I would say I’m an accidental entrepreneur. I never planned to be an entrepreneur. When I got here and I wanted to go back to work, I applied at a local hospital. They told me I was way too overqualified, which I kind of knew based on what I’d been doing in Montana and Alaska, that I would be overqualified for a very simple clinical position, but I didn’t want the managerial stuff that came with what I had been doing. I finally, after eight months, begged this hospital just to give me a job. They kept saying, “You’re too overqualified. We can get a new grad for like 20K less a year.” That’s the thing with Colorado is everybody wants to live here. They want to be here.

 


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In my field, there’s so many dietitians and there are so few jobs available, so for me, I was an accidental entrepreneur. I was like, “Well, screw that. Now I have to figure out something for myself,” so that’s when I went to private practice, but that wasn’t a good fit, either. For me, I felt like there were so many people who could do the clinical stuff, but there weren’t a lot of people who could do … I guess I felt like my genius was food, and that coming up with stuff that’s easy, that’s super-doable for everybody every day … because that’s what people were asking for, so yeah, I accidentally became an entrepreneur.

Doug Stetzer:

Right. That kind of brings us, I think … It dovetails well into The Real Food Dietitians, your business. It’s the website realfoodrds and your Instagram realfoodrds, @realfoodrds, right?

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah. We’re just @therealfoodrds, R-D-S. Yep.

Doug Stetzer:

Okay. You mentioned that this journey is really only 18 months in the making, and here you have 25,000 followers. I love your Instagram. It’s really amazing. That’s how I, I think, interact with you most as far as professionally. Just following that and seeing your recipes and … Again, getting back to that quote that I read at the beginning, that it can be easy, and a lot of your recipes try to keep the ingredient list kind of down.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah.

Doug Stetzer:

Tell us, I guess, first what is real food to you, and why we should all be eating a real food diet.

Jessica Beacom:

Real food, okay. To me, real food is food that, ideally, doesn’t come from a package. Being a realist, being a mom, and being, I guess, a mompreneur, I get that sometimes you have to use packages. When my real food journey started, it started because of a major health crisis I was having in 2012 that landed me in the hospital with a scary anaphylactic issue. I came home and I picked up a book called It Starts With Food written by Melissa Hartwig and Dallas Hartwig, and it talked about real food. To them, it was getting rid of grain, and soy, and alcohol, and sugar, and dairy, and just peeling back everything that could possibly be allergenic or you could be sensitive to. That was my first foray into “real food” other than Weston A. Price, which, to them, real food is sprouted greens and whole milk dairy, which we’d been doing, but obviously it wasn’t enough.

When I read It Starts With Food, I did a Whole30 and I improved a little bit, but then I went on to something called The Autoimmune Paleo Protocol. I did that for nine months and improved markedly, and so I stayed on a Paleo diet. I mean, I primarily eat Paleo now, and it’s been almost four years, but in that real food realm. When I say real food, I mean it’s not dyed. It’s not artificially flavored. It’s as minimally processed as possible. It’s wholesome, close to the earth, probably something you’re going to … like your grandma, your great-grandma would recognize. My great-grandma, if she walked into a supermarket, she’d flip out. She wouldn’t recognize half of it.

Doug Stetzer:

Like, “What is all of this?”

Jessica Beacom:

Even my great-great-grandma, like, “What is this shit?” To me, that’s real food. Yeah.

Doug Stetzer:

Okay. I want to get back to it because I definitely identify with this constant tweaking your diet because of certain health issues. My personal thing is not life-threatening. I don’t land up in the hospital, but I have skin issues. When I was in New York City and was out entertaining clients every single night and just had this insane, fast-paced lifestyle, I mean, I wore it on the outside. I have psoriasis, and you can see it. Things start to change. Your family situation changes. You’re slowing down and they’re deciding to live in a place like this instead of a place like New York City. Again, this kind of gets back to the growth in this area, and so I think it’s a common thing that is going on with a lot of people. They’re choosing lifestyles over just a constant work environment or things like that. When I get off having vodka as my primary source of-

Jessica Beacom:

Hydration?

Doug Stetzer:

.. dietary nutrition, then all of a sudden, my skin is great and I look better and feel better. It’s super weird. I don’t know. It may be magic. I’m always constantly do that. Since then, I’ve stripped out a lot of the dairy, and the sugars, and caffeine, and things like that, but because I have this real physical manifestation of when I’m unhealthy. That was just interesting. I haven’t really gone super far down the road, but I do constantly tweak my diet, and I think about what’s going in, because I feel it as soon as I veer too far off the course, which kind of leads me now … I wanted to ask you a little more about this Whole30, because I didn’t really know what it was until you were telling me that you and your husband were doing the Whole30 Diet. I researched it a little bit, but … I’ve kind of integrated elements of that diet into my life, but I’ve never done the full cleanse, the full effect.

Jessica Beacom:

The full Monty?

Doug Stetzer:

Right. Having the beer on Thursday night or Friday night is … that’s a tough one. Tell us a little bit about Whole30 and what that is.

Jessica Beacom:

Okay. The Whole30, it goes back to that book I mentioned, It Starts With Food, written by Melissa and Dallas Hartwig. The Whole30 is a program that they had designed that takes grain, dairy, soy, legumes, sugar, alcohol, and most processed foods out of your diet for 30 days. The idea is that, by taking them out, you’re able to kind of reset. Then when you re-add them back, you do so in a slow re-introductory way so you can see, “Does gluten bother me? Does dairy bother me? Does alcohol bother me? And how do they manifest when I eat them?” The other good thing is that it allows you to look at your food habits or your behaviors around food like are you addicted to sugar, or do you think you need something, or do you eat mindlessly, do you eat for stress reasons? It can be hard. It’s 30 days. You just have to commit to like, “Okay, for the next 30 days … ”

Really, honestly, I think if you have a health condition like you’re saying, and it’s that important to you to feel better, 30 days is really a drop in the bucket. I think about the 12-and-a-half years I was on chronic daily steroids because of my autoimmune disease. That 30 days was nothing to me. Then even to go another 90 days, taking out even more than what the Whole30 takes out, was nothing compared to the previous 12-and-a-half years of hell. It really depends on your motivation. If you’re doing it for weight loss, it’s probably not going to be motivating enough, but if you’re doing it because you just feel like crap, you probably can get through it. I don’t know.

It gets a lot of crap. People are like, “Oh, it’s so strict,” and, “Oh, it takes out this.” Especially in my field being a dietitian, people are like, “You cannot live without grain.” Well, you can. “You cannot live without dairy.” Well, you can. You can actually thrive without these things. People like you and I who have things going on who wear our diet basically on the outside or the way we look … I mean, I walk through public spaces and I can look at people and be like, “Ooh, they really gotta get off the dairy,” or, “Oh, you know, I think gluten’s probably their issue.” Yeah, so for people like you and I, it’s a lot more compelling to take that journey. Then your 30 days is over and you go back to doing whatever you want minus whatever you didn’t like about your previous diet.

Doug Stetzer:

Sure, sure. Yeah. Again, that point about not being on a diet, right? Your motivation is feeling good, not losing a few pounds or anything like that. That motivational level is totally different.

Jessica Beacom:

That’s kind of the, I think, the premise behind our entire website and our philosophy is that we don’t talk … Even though we’re dietitians, we don’t talk about food as like, “This is a bad food, and this is good food, and this food will help you lose weight,” because it’s not going to be the same from person to person. Everybody’s essentially an N of one, so they’re a study of themselves. What works for me isn’t going to work for you. What works for you isn’t going to work for the next person. For us, it’s looking at food like, “If this is something that works well for you, then … ” I mean, and it goes beyond food. It goes beyond nutrition, too. It’s like is it fast? Is it easy? Is it nourishing? Is it something you’re not going to get totally stressed out about? Yeah, we’re really big on that whole, “Your food shouldn’t be stressful.”

Doug Stetzer:

Sure, sure. You see that all over your website, and that’s … Like you said, making things accessible. It needs to be part of your lifestyle every day, and so that’s a big part of what’s on your website, meal plans, a lot of recipe ideas that are not complex, and a clear and solid love affair with your slow cooker.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah, and my Instant Pot.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah. I do most of the cooking in my house, and I’m horrible at planning. I’m always just pulling stuff out at four o’clock like, “All right. What am I gonna invent, like, out of what is available?” I do not really cook with the slow cooker, but your recipes always inspire me to think about it, and so tell me, the slow cooker, is it just where it’s at?

Jessica Beacom:

It is. I mean, I think the slow cooker’s great for anybody who has the ability to plan ahead. The night before, if you can take 10, 15 minutes and set something up so in the morning you turn it on … You put it in the actual slow cooker and you turn it on and then put the lid on. When you come home … Especially on days when we take the kids to the pool, I won’t go to the pool unless there’s something waiting in the slow cooker for them, because it’s like critical mass. We hit critical mass the minute we hit the front door on so many nights. Yeah, the slow cooker’s kind of like a big saving grace for most people.

I think if you can’t plan far enough ahead … Sometimes I fall in this, too, not because I can’t plan far enough ahead, but if I’m developing recipes for the website, I’m kind of all over the place. I might be developing a dessert, or a cocktail, or an entrée, and then it’s not really anything that’s cohesively going to come together in a meal, you know?

Doug Stetzer:

Right.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah, we could have pork chops, and pudding, and mojitos, but it’d be-

Doug Stetzer:

It’s like, “Hey, kids. Mojito-flavored … we’ll call it soup, I guess, for tonight.”

Jessica Beacom:

Exactly. For me, then, I’ve kind of switched to the Instant Pot, which is a pressure cooker, and I don’t really have to think ahead. I can convert anything from a slow cooker to an Instant Pot recipe and do it in like 15 minutes, so a 6-hour slow cooker recipe can be done in 15 to 45 minutes.

Doug Stetzer:

Oh, all right.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah.

Doug Stetzer:

I like the sound of … That’s more my speed, yeah.

Jessica Beacom:

That’s I think what you need, that. That’s what you need. You can do it frozen. You can put your frozen chicken in there.

Doug Stetzer:

No way.

Jessica Beacom:

Oh, yeah. Totally.

Doug Stetzer:

Oh, this is revolutionary, everybody.

Jessica Beacom:

You need one of those.

Doug Stetzer:

Things are about to change around this house.

Jessica Beacom:

I know, right? Instant Pot for the win.

 


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Doug Stetzer:

Instant Pot, yeah. Okay. I’m making the notes, don’t worry. That is a good idea. Again, it has to fit your lifestyle. I am not a good planner, especially around meals or, really, much else. It’s like just throw everything in the turbo charger. That really works for me. Awesome.

On the website, lots of recipes, lots of meal prep, so the shopping actually lists that you need to do as well.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah. We just did a big series. It was 12 weeks of meal prep menus. The idea behind a meal prep is that on the weekend you set aside a couple of hours, you go grocery shopping, you get what’s on the list that we have made for you, and then you go into the kitchen and you prep five recipes. You can do it within two hours from start to finish. Those five recipes won’t get you through the entire week, but they will at least give you a good start. You might have two entrees, a soup or a salad, a dessert or some kind of a snack, and then one other. Yeah, getting into meal prep is huge. It’s kind of the gateway drug to organization. Even for somebody who doesn’t plan or isn’t good at planning day to day, if you can plan for a weekend meal prep and knock out a few recipes, it makes a huge difference.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, okay. I need some rehab on that, but I’m going to work on it, because I do get tired of just … When you cook like I do, you tend to have two or three go-to things, and you’re kind of on the treadmill as far as that. If there’s a couple of winners that you know the family will eat and you know you can whip it up, you tend to just keep those things around. Even if I just added two new things to that, I think everybody in the house wold probably appreciate it.

Jessica Beacom:

Totally. You know, too, I think if you’re the kind of person who walks in and you just kind of cook off the hip all the time, you tend to have a lot of extra groceries in your house because when you go shopping, you’re like, “Oh, I should grab this, this, and this, and this just in case,” but you don’t have a plan, so you end up spending a lot more money than what you would normally spend. You also end up wasting a lot because a lot of times the broccoli will go floppy in the crisper. You didn’t get to it. You had a plan to, but you didn’t. Yeah, I think the value of a meal plan is that you can be prepared. You can just get what you need, just use what you need. Yeah, it ends up saving you money too and time.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah. I think that’s actually a conversation we have a lot around here, which is why our grocery bill’s so huge and why … Yeah. It’s really frustrating when things are just going bad in your fridge. You’re trying to keep fresh foods around. You’re not trying to just open cans all the time, but when something goes bad, it’s just so annoying.

Jessica Beacom:

Oh, yeah, because you’re like, “Oh, my gosh. I could have put that money towards a pair of skis.” You know what I mean? I mean, that’s the Colorado mentality, like, “Oh, man. I could have put that towards skis,” or-

Doug Stetzer:

That one head of floppy broccoli could have been a pair of skis. I like that.

Jessica Beacom:

I mean, it ultimately adds up, or it could have been new mountain bike tires or something else. It’s like, “Shit.” I always see it that it’s a loss of opportunity because I let this food go to waste.

Doug Stetzer:

Totally.

Jessica Beacom:

If I didn’t make a plan and we’re like, “Oh, we have to go out to eat …” You really can’t dine out in Boulder for less than 50 bucks unless you’re going to the Mickey D’s.

Doug Stetzer:

Totally. Right.

Jessica Beacom:

Then I’m always like, “That 50 bucks,” like, “Yeah, I had to cook at home, but it probably would have cost me like 12, 15 bucks, so the other 40-something could have been towards a pair of skis.” You know?

Doug Stetzer:

Right. Exactly.

Jessica Beacom:

Or a lift ticket somewhere.

Doug Stetzer:

Oh, man. Absolutely.

Jessica Beacom:

That’s funny.

Doug Stetzer:

I totally run that equation in my head all the time. Then I’ve got one of my kids who totally prefers the house food. When I’m like, “Okay, let’s go out tonight,” they’re like, “I don’t want to go out. I want home food.”

Jessica Beacom:

Right.

Doug Stetzer:

Once you’ve started cooking-

Jessica Beacom:

Those are Boulder problems.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, exactly. Exactly. The home food is just better than the going out food.

Jessica Beacom:


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Yeah.

Doug Stetzer:

There’s a lot of other things that goes into that, but that’s super fun.

Jessica Beacom:

I mean, we do have awesome restaurants here in Boulder, but some days I want a break from cooking, and I’ll be like, “Oh, we should go out.” My husband will say, “No way. Your food’s better.” I’m like, “No. Come on.”

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah. It’s like, “Yeah, but I do that for work.”

Jessica Beacom:

I know. I do this for a living. I always say like, “I cook for a living.”

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Every once in a while, I just want it to arrive, and then I want the plate to disappear also.

Jessica Beacom:

Exactly. I know.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, exactly.

Jessica Beacom:

That’s how we end up at Upslope, but you cannot live on beer.

Doug Stetzer:

Well, that’s debatable, but that kind of brings us right back to where we started about my health issues.

Jessica Beacom:

Mine, too.

Doug Stetzer:

Excellent. Well, speaking of the families, I think … Again, all these recipes, all this stuff, The Real Food Dietitians website, all of this stuff will be in the show notes, these books that you’ve been mentioning.

Jessica Beacom:

The Instant Pot?

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, the Instant Pot. Oh, my gosh.

Jessica Beacom:

The life changer.

Doug Stetzer:

I cannot wait to order one of these things. All of this will be in the show notes. Since we’ve brought up the skis, I mean, again, this is why people are moving to Colorado.

Jessica Beacom:

Totally.

Doug Stetzer:

This is what’s going on here. I mean, there’s supportive infrastructure for entrepreneurs. People are doing amazing things in a lot of different industries. Boulder, they talk a lot about the tech, but what I’ve come to learn is that there’s this amazing infrastructure for the food industry. There’s just great things going on, but we’re moving here for the lifestyle for a lot of different reasons. Since we brought up the skiing, we might as well talk about it. I would ask you what’s your favorite thing to do, but I think we all know at this point, so skiing where? Favorite spot?

Jessica Beacom:

My most favorite? I’m pretty partial to Crested Butte just because it’s big and wide-open. They just have some sweet snow. We do ski locally at Eldora most of the time.

Doug Stetzer:

Totally.

Jessica Beacom:

Just because I am not a sit-in-I70-with-my-kids kind of person. By the time you get there, all the snacks are gone. They have to pee. They have to poop. Somebody’s got to get out. It sucks, so we usually ski locally, but then if we do, we’ll go out … Yeah, I like Crested Butte. Winter Park is fun. It’s not super far away.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, Crested Butte’s amazing.

Jessica Beacom:

It is amazing.

Doug Stetzer:

They had their craziest season. I was just looking at some pictures of the houses buried. I did not make it out there this year, but-

Jessica Beacom:

We went for the Alley Loop, the cross-country ski race, and literally the snow banks were over the houses. It was so amazing. We ended up getting “stuck” I guess. We opted to get stuck there, and it just dumped. It was so amazing.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah. The getting stuck when you actually … It snowed after you decided to get stuck?

Jessica Beacom:

Right.

Doug Stetzer:

Instead of it snowed before you actually got stuck.

Jessica Beacom:

Well, we knew it was coming.

Doug Stetzer:

You’re like, “Well, it’s gonna snow … ”

Jessica Beacom:

So we might as well stay.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, so, “We’re kind of stuck mentally. We just can’t get ourselves to leave.”

Jessica Beacom:

“We just cannot get off the mountain to get over the pass in time.” That’s what it was. The kids were like, “No, just one more, just one more run, one more run.” We’re like, “Well, you know, we’re limiting the time we’re gonna have to get over the pass,” and then there was no more.

Doug Stetzer:

That’s okay.

Jessica Beacom:

It was fine.

Doug Stetzer:

Exactly.

Jessica Beacom:

That’s the hallmark of a good Colorado parent, whether or not you let your kids miss school for skiing.

Doug Stetzer:

Oh, yeah. Yeah, it’s preferable, actually, the weekdays.

Jessica Beacom:

Right.

Doug Stetzer:

The weekdays, everybody knows that. How about here in town? You mentioned Eldora. We do a lot of skiing together at Eldora with the kids. It’s just amazing. To have that a half-hour away from the house instead of when I was driving five or six hours to go up to Vermont every weekend up on the East Coast, so that’s great. What about just on a regular Saturday? You’re getting out of the house with the kids. Favorite hikes, spots, rivers, lakes, anything?

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah, we go to Chautauqua a lot and hike up there. Sometimes we go to NCAR, which is just at the top of the hill there, and then hike from there up the hill and then back down. If we’re taking a longer trip and it’s going to be a couple of hours, we’ll go to Rocky Mountain National Park up in Estes. That’s kind of our go-to. We go there a lot. It’s easy to kind of lose yourself for the entire day, and then you leave, and then, of course, everybody wants ice cream, and just kind of a chill place to be.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah. If you’re just coming, whether you’re from Denver or coming from anywhere else in the country to visit and you end up in Boulder for the day, so Chautauqua’s just … I mean, it’s amazing. It’s beautiful. It’s right there. There’s like millions of trails.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah, it’s easy.

Doug Stetzer:

Then to have Rocky Mountain National Park, which I can’t really verify this, but I think it’s probably the second-most visited national park in the country to Yellowstone or something like that.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah, I have no idea, but it doesn’t feel busy. It’s so big it doesn’t feel busy.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah. That’s just like an hour-and-a-half, so that’s a day trip. It’s a real special treat for people who live here.

Jessica Beacom:

It’s cheap. It’s like 40 bucks for the whole year.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, exactly.

Jessica Beacom:

40 bucks. You pay 40 bucks and you can go whenever you want.

Doug Stetzer:

Yeah, and you’re going to see some elk, and you’re going to see maybe some bears, something like that.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah. If your kids like buses because they don’t have to be in car seats like mine do, then you park at the park-and-ride and you just take the bus. Then you get to a trail head and then you hike from one trail head to the next place. We usually go to the top at Bear Lake and then we hike down to the falls and down to Bierstadt Lake, and then we can pick up the shuttle whenever we want.

Doug Stetzer:

Oh, that’s great because I usually just drive up there, but if you take the shuttle then you don’t have to make a loop out of it. You can just hike in a straight line and pick it up somewhere else.

Jessica Beacom:

Yeah. You park at the very bottom at the park-and-ride. You can go wherever.

Doug Stetzer:

I’ll love that. Finally, before we wrap up, I want to ask people who come on the show who they would love to hear on this podcast, whether in your industry, not, anyone else. It doesn’t even have to be because they’re an entrepreneur, just people who are doing amazing things, just anyone who comes to mind that you would love people in Colorado … just they need to know about these people.

Jessica Beacom:

Oh, totally. I have to tag my BFF, Fanny. She runs Hill Road Merino, and so she’s making wool clothes for adults and for children so that they can play outside and stay warm. Yeah, you have to have her.

Doug Stetzer:                       Yeah, and she’s got an interesting story.

Jessica Beacom:                Totally.

Doug Stetzer:                       I don’t know her that well, but I do know her through the school. We’re all wearing Smartwool these days, and these merino clothes are super amazing.

Jessica Beacom:                I think she’s amazing in that she is an elite athlete, a skier, a cross-country skier, and then a runner, and so she balances mom life with her athlete life with this business that she started as a hobby. She started making kids’ clothing to keep her kids warm, and then now she’s got this giant business. Yeah, I think she’s a great one to talk to. She’s got it going on. She makes me look like a total hack.

Doug Stetzer:                       I don’t know about that. I will reach out her with your help and try to get her on here because that would be an amazing conversation. She’s got a really cool story.

Jessica Beacom:                She does.

Doug Stetzer:                       Awesome. All right. Well, thank you so much for coming on here.

Jessica Beacom:                You’re welcome.

Doug Stetzer:                       I hope everybody has learned a lot about what you’re all about. I really appreciate it. It was a great story. Thanks a lot.

Jessica Beacom:                Hey, thanks Doug.

Doug Stetzer:                       All right.

All right, everyone. Thanks for listening. I hope you enjoyed that interview with Jessica Beacom. Remember, if you want to check out more of our interviews, head on over to the website at colorado.fm. You can also find this podcast on iTunes.

If you know somebody who you’d love to hear on this podcast and you want to reach out, shoot me a note at doug@colorado.fm. I’d love to hear from you. All right. Thanks a lot.

 

 


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